How can we prevent obesity.

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What is obesity?


A disorder involving excessive body fat that increases the risk of health problems.
Obesity often results from taking in more calories than are burned by exercise and normal daily activities.


Very common
More than 10 million cases per year (India)


Usually self-treatable
Usually self-diagnosable
Lab tests or imaging not required
Chronic: can last for years or be lifelong

Obesity is a medical condition in which excess body fat has accumulated to an extent that it may have a negative effect on health.

People are generally considered obese when their body mass index (BMI), a measurement obtained by dividing a person’s weight by the square of the person’s height—despite known allometric inaccuracies[a]—is over 30 kg/m2; the range 25–30 kg/m2 is defined as overweight.

Some East Asian countries use lower values. Obesity is correlated with various diseases and conditions, particularly cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, obstructive sleep apnea, certain types of cancer, and osteoarthritis.

High BMI is a marker of risk, but not proven to be a direct cause, for diseases caused by diet, physical activity, and environmental factors.

A reciprocal link has been found between obesity and depression, with obesity increasing the risk of clinical depression and also depression leading to a higher chance of developing obesity.

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Effects on body health due to obesity.

Excessive body weight is associated with various diseases and conditions, particularly cardiovascular diseases, diabetes mellitus type 2, obstructive sleep apnea, certain types of cancer, osteoarthritis, and asthma.

As a result, obesity has been found to reduce life expectancy.

Improving eating habits and increasing physical activity play a vital role in preventing obesity. Recommendations for adults include:

Keep a food diary of what you ate, where you ate, and how you were feeling before and after you ate.

Eat 5 to 9 servings of fruits and vegetables daily. A vegetable serving is 1 cup of raw vegetables or 1/2 cup of cooked vegetables or vegetable juice. A fruit serving is 1 piece of small to medium fresh fruit, 1/2 cup of canned or fresh fruit or fruit juice, or 1/4 cup of dried fruit.

Choose whole grain foods, such as brown rice and whole wheat bread. Don’t eat highly processed foods made with refined white sugar, flour, high-fructose corn syrup and saturated fat.

Weigh and measure food to be able to learn correct portion sizes. For example, a 3-ounce serving of meat is the size of a deck of cards. Don’t order supersized menu items.

Learn to read food nutrition labels and use them, keep the number of portions you are really eating in mind.

Balance the food “checkbook.” If you eat more calories than you burn you will gain weight. Weigh yourself on a weekly basis.

Don’t eat foods that are high in “energy density,” or that have a lot of calories in a small amount of food. For example, an average cheeseburger with and order of fries can have as much as 1,000 calories and 30 or more grams of fat. By ordering a grilled chicken sandwich or a plain hamburger and a small salad with low-fat dressing, you can avoid hundreds of calories and eliminate much of the fat intake. For dessert, have a serving of fruit, yogurt, a small piece of angel food cake, or a piece of dark chocolate instead of frosted cake, ice cream, or pie.

Simply reducing portion sizes and using a smaller plate can help you lose weight.

Aim for an average of 60 to 90 minutes or more of moderate to intense physical activity 3 to 4 days each week. Examples of moderate intensity exercise are walking a 15-minute mile, or weeding and hoeing a garden. Running or playing singles tennis are examples of more intense activities.

Look for ways to get even 10 or 15 minutes of some type of activity during the day. Walking around the block or up and down a few flights of stairs is a good start.

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Prevention


Exercise regularly. You need to get 150 to 300 minutes of moderate-intensity activity a week to prevent weight gain.


Follow a healthy-eating plan.


Know and avoid the food traps that cause you to eat.


Monitor your weight regularly.


Be consistent.

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